About your Search

20130201
20130209
STATION
MSNBC 7
MSNBCW 7
CNN 3
CNNW 3
CSPAN 3
CSPAN2 2
LANGUAGE
English 32
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
that information. intelligence committee chairwoman dianne feinstein said despite reports drones have killed hundreds of civilians -- >> the figures we've obtained from the executive branch which we have done our utmost to verify confirm that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. >> john: which would make anyone opposed to the drone war killing civilians feel so much better. on the plus side, senator feinstein provided plans to provide oversight of the drone war. >> i also intend to review proposals for regulation -- excuse me, for legislation to ensure that drone strikes are carried out in a manner consistent with our values. and that the proposal to create and an na log of the foreign intelligence surveillance court to review the conduct of such strikes. >> john: it is worth noting a 2012 poll shows americans already think drone strikes are consistent with our values. nearly four out of five adults approve the use of drone strikes against terrorist suspects overseas. 2/3 suspected using drones to kill ameri
that was introduced last month by senator dianne feinstein, and that you heard mentioned again today by the president. now, that's not necessarily a done deal. that's not necessarily final. if that bill reaches the senate, the senate floor without a ban he is now a senator and represents the whole state. we called senator murphy's office tonight to get his reaction to this reporting of how gun policy reform might move through the senate. he said, quote, too many people in washington want to eulogize specific pieces of common-sense gun reform before the debate has even started. how can we wait for another state to join connecticut on the tragically long list of states devastated by gun violence? there would be more girls and boys alive in newtown today if the ban on military-style and magazines had been on the books in december. she does not yet have the votes she needs to pass it, but she is not giving. she has key supporters clueing dick durbin and chuck schumer. and remember, historically speaking, it was dianne feinstein who got the old assault weapons ban passed in 1994, and nobody thought she co
. senator feinstein was obviously working behind the scenes. and so finally last night around 6:30, 7:00 last night, the white house relented and the president called wyden. i know you guys are going to talk to wyden later. but this is a very big deal because now the drone policy is going to be central to this confirmation hearing today. >> you know, yesterday pete wehner wrote this. and he's quoting barack obama from may 29th, 2009, the famous speech at the national archives. where he says, let me be clear. we are at war with al qaeda, but we need to update our institutions and do so with an abiding confidence in the rule of law and due process. in checks and balances and accountability for reasons i will explain, the decisions were made over the last eight years during the bush years established an ad hoc legal approach for fighting terrorism that was neither effective nor sustainable. a framework that failed to rely on our legal traditions and time-tested institutions and that failed to use our values as a compass. those words, steve, whether you agree with this drone program or no
last month by senator dianne feinstein, and that you heard mentioned again today by the president. now, that's not necessarily a done deal. that's not necessarily final. if that bill reaches the senate, the senate floor without a ban on assault weapons included, it is possible lawmakers could then amend the bill on the senate floor to include the ban. but they also might not. sam stein at "huffington post" reported today that the assault weapons ban might be strategically sacrificed in order for the rest of the president's plan to go through. sam stein reporting that advocates for gun control are not as concerned about the assault weapons ban as they are with some other elements of the president's package. jim kessler of americans for gun safety says, quote, if you are going to die at the hands of a criminal with a gun, it's going to be a handgun. and statistically speaking, which is what he means, that might be true. but it's not handguns that people remember from a tragedy like what happened at sandy hook elementary in december. it's assault weapons that now appear so difficult in po
automatically and guns t banned under dianne feinstein's law. when the department of homeland security uses them they are used in self-defense. but when i want to use it's considered, i do. >> sean: first of all, it's none of your business. i'm a shooter and that is why i look it. you said a gun is not your best option? >> no. >> sean: so a shooter comes in here. what are you going to do? are you going to grab scissors? >> i'm going to try to exit as quickly as possible. i think the bottom line you are more likely to be shot by law enforcement that arrives on the scene and don't know that you are a bystander and actual shooter. in tucson someone arrived with a gun.... >> sean: do you know how silly this sounds. if you can't get behind a desk and you can't call 911 and if you can't go to where the shooter is, treating like you are in kindergarten. then they are saying use a scissors. then we're going to use scissors. that is ridiculous. >> your keys will be locked in your desk. why do the department of homeland security that it's a great weapon for self-defense but not a great defense for regular
senator feinstein and obama. i say perverse, because he then goes out and commits a set of atrocities with a gun. he sounds completely unhinged, yet the catalyst for all this appeared to be his firing from the lapd. do you have any recollection of what happened with him? do you remember him? >> first off, we don't know hot the catalyst was. the firing was back in 2008, i believe. it's now over five years ago. so what has transpired during those five years, the court several years later upheld the firing. so as to what triggered the actions, the producing of the manifesto, the separate sending of a package to cnn last friday, we don't know. and we won't know until they either apprehend him or other information comes forward. so was it the firing? was it something else that transpired? he appears to have a lot of anger directed to a lot of different people. some who have no relationship at all, as best we can tell, with anything having to do with the discharge. >> the package he sent to anderson cooper, which anderson didn't see until today, wasn't made aware of it, it contained a numbe
the most beautiful post offices here in new york, and we can look at dianne feinstein's office husband for that. we'll look into it. >> micromanaged by congress but they don't get the taxpayer money from congress. it's a time bomb by the bush administration to make government smaller. >> john: exactly. >> and so everything that they want to see--yes--it comes to fruition. >> and all these people who sitting around all these year not attacking congress, congress attacks them. >> how does it make you feel? >> that was sent from you and it was anthrax. i regifted it. >> john: anyone who remembers the 80s and 90s postal workers are the people you do not want to upset. we'll talk about a very special birthday, and we're not talking about bob marley. we'll be right back. [ ♪ music ♪ ] break the ice with breath-freshening cooling crystals. ice breakers. running out of aerosols can get pretty frustrating. try the air wick freshmatic. it automatically fills the air with its captivating scent. just one freshmatic refill lasts as long as 55 aerosol cans. and with so many rich, indulgent
calling for the original justice department memo to be released senate intelligence chair dianne feinstein suggested full transparency has already been achieved, quote. i have been calling for the public release of the administration's legal analysis of the use of lethal force, particularly against u.s. citizens, for more than a year. that analysis is now public, and the american people can review and judge the legality of these operations. the bottom line is that the white house doesn't steam have much of a political problem with the public. the public is intent to go after the bad guys, if you will, regardless of the concerns of a slippery slope, and unless the public begins to share in the outrage, congress may not show it, but it's amazing that one of the three branches of government doesn't want to know why it does not have oversight over this executive branch policy. >>> finally, the reason we're here in chicago today. last night i sat down with the brain trust of the obama and the romney campaigns. eight of the top advisers, all in one room at the university of chicago's institute o
] >> chris: chris the only thing real there was trash talk. dianne feinstein is leading the confirmation hearings for cia director nominee john brennan and that's "special report" for tonight. i'm chris wallace in washington. keep it right here on fox where more news is always on the way. "special report" online with a twist starts right now. >> shepard: this is the fox report. tonight, more graphic testimony from a woman on trial for killing her boyfriend. she says she shot him, stabbed him, slit his throat. but jody arias says it was actually all his fault. plus, say good bye to mail on saturday. >> delivery schedule too big of a cost savings to ignore. >> shepard: tonight, why letter carriers say this is going to be a disaster. the $10,000 college degree. >> such a great price for such a great education. >> what we're bringing to the table is opportunity and access. >> shepard: what do you really get for your money? plus, monopoly announces which token will never again pass go. and which new one will take its place. but first from fox this wednesday night. a woman who admits stabbing
. the senators from san francisco and california, the 49ers, senators feinstein and boxer. speaker pelosi was with us yesterday in new orleans. and thousands of fans from all over the world and, of course, watching on television. and i think -- i wanted to make a note on this floor, not because it was just a sporting event -- although it's one of i think the highest watched super bowls ever in the history of the game, but, mr. president, because of the role that this congress played and the administration in helping this great city and region and state rebound from what was a devastating body blow 7 1/2 years ago when hurricane katrina and then rita hit three weeks later and then the levees broke anin over 52 places, the city wt virtually underwater, at least two-thirds of the city. and to see 7 1/2 years later the city rebound, the people of new orleans and louisiana are just foremost in my thoughts right now for their fighting spirit, theirry sell yancy, their unwilling -- their resiliency, their unwillingness to give occupy this special place in will celebrate its 300th birthday in 201
and was sort of smacked down by dianne feinstein. but now it's out there so much that the secrecy element is gone, and i think there has to be a real discussion both about the constitutionality particularly when it comes to american citizens but also the wider ramifications of whether this is actually serving our national security cause. because whilst you're taking out some al qaeda leaders, you're causing huge amounts of resentments in some of these areas and possibly fueling the next generation of militants in places like yemen and the pakistani borders, if we extend it into somalia or mali, there are a whole lot of people who are going to feel extremely angry about missiles raining down out of the sky and taking down people not always associated with terrorism. there's a story in "the new york times" this morning of an imam who spoke out against al qaeda. operatives came to speak to him. as they were speaking under a tree to threaten him, missiles came down and took them out. what does that do in that community in terms of a sense of what america is doing, anger towards america and th
example. senator feinstein's subcommittee -- she had a hearing last year. general cartwright and admiral pickering -- or ambassador pickering testified, and they went into this. any action we would take would have to be negotiated, it would have to be bilateral, no unilateral action, and they made that point again on the record in front of senator feinstein's subcommittee. and i support that. i agree with that. >> i have another statement from the report. the united states icbm rapid reaction posture remains in operation and runs a real risk of accidental or mistaken launch. i think that statement is pretty clear. do you agree with that? >> yes. i mean, i the accidental launch and those kinds of things are always to be concerned about, and we need to assure as we have over the years that that does not happen, but on the russian -- >> that we will run a real risk of accident or mistaken launch? >> if you put just "risk," but there's always a risk. when we are talking about nuclear weapons, and the consequences, as you know, you do not get a lot of second chances. we need to be very sure a
cuomo and senator feinstein suggested they could just have everything registered means they could have a forced by back i do you own that they will sell it to a government which is confiscation. but there are other reasons why we did not want the federal registry, one is where somebody in new york with they got the list of owners and results have not been good. there was a time assume all the best motives of the government, they could lock in the vault but we cannot even check your -- superior national defense secrets, if you go through the system they can check you but they cannot keep the record because it is checked. canada imposed a registry that they just abolished because it costs millions of dollars in did not do anything. between the '60s and '80s they had to keep track of the ignition and they finally said it makes no sense. ammunition is a commodity with tens of paperwork. so what works and what doesn't? >> you mentioned democrats better members of your organization it seems maybe the most prominent is harry reid. or maybe at one point* for my kid you characterize your relati
think the hardest sell on the hill right now will be senator feinstein's all-out assault weapons ban she's introduced. that's going to be a hard sell to those conservative democrats who are up for re-election in 2014, senators like mark baggage of alaska, max baucus of montana. that's going to be the hardest sell. universal background checks i think is where the consensus is building, although the senate judiciary hearing on tuesday or wednesday, one of the things that happened was that the national rifle association said that is not something that they can get behind. so you know, they're definitely going to be scoring those votes. i think it's going to be a harder sell than maybe folks originally thought when it comes to universal background checks. >> let's take a look at what's happening in massachusetts. lauren, scott scott brown saying he's not going to run for the senate seat opened up by john kerry. wasn't that the best hope republicans had to get that seat? >> a poll came out showing he had a slight lead on the democrat's candidate, ed marquee. i think he really was one of the b
guns. have you looked at the feinstein bill? that is exactly what he has done. i think of what they will do is turn this universal check on the law-abiding into a universal registry of law-abiding people, law abiding people do not want that. >> forgive me, sir, you take something that is here and say that it will go all the way over there. there is no indication. i can understand that you are saying that that is the threat, but nothing from the -- but nothing from the administration indicates that. >> obama care was not a tax until they needed to be a tax. >> that was the supreme court. host: weighing in on the conversation, the financial crisis, did it delay your retirement? on twitter you can participate as well. host: let's hear from sandra in virginia. hello. caller: i am the wife of a retired pastor. he is not retired, we cannot retire. because when the crash happened, we received notice from our retirement fund that in order for them to serve everyone, they were going to cut everyone, so we got a cut from 2100 per month to 1600 per month. my husband has to continue workin
. this is prior to the law. senator feinstein suggested if they could get registered, they could have forced buybacks. in modern times, there are two other reasons why you do not want a federal registry. one was in new york and someone got a hold of the list. the results have been not good. there was a time when all of the best motives on the part of the government. they could take a list and lock it in the vault and be secure. we cannot even secure national defense secrets now. the arts are that if we kept that registry -- and it is illegal now. if you go to the system, they can check you but they cannot keep the record. it is checked and then there is no cost to canada had a big registry but they just stopped it because it did not do anything. in the 60's and the 80's, people had to keep track of ammunition sales. finally the government said this makes no sense because ammunition is a commodity and that does not do any good. it takes tons and tons of paperwork to look at it. the question is what works and what doesn't work. >> you mentioned that there are plenty of democrats who were membe
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)